Retail

What Is A PSE Mail Processing Clerk

By David Krug David Krug is the CEO & President of Bankovia. He's a lifelong expat who has lived in the Philippines, Mexico, Thailand, and Colombia. When he's not reading about cryptocurrencies, he's researching the latest personal finance software. 6 minute read

Most people only pay attention to mail when it arrives at their door. ‘Mail’ As far as I can tell, that makes perfect sense. However, a vast army of USPS personnel processes and sorts your mail before it ever gets to your door.

PSE Mail Processing Clerks are the ones in charge of ensuring that packages reach their intended destinations. You’re not the only one interested in this position (or applying)! So, here’s what I’ve learned about the position!

About PSE Mail Processing Clerk 2022

PSE (Mail Processing Clerk) is a non-permanent post at the USPS as of 2022. Preparation and distribution of mail are the duties of PSEs. Most of them work more than 40 hours a week for an hourly wage of $19. After one year of service, they are also entitled for health benefits.

If you’re interested in learning more about the perks of working as a USPS PSE Mail Processing Clerk, keep reading!

What Does A PSE Mail Processing Clerk Do?

To get mail ready for distribution and delivery, Postal Support Employees (PSE) Mail Processing Clerks run and maintain a variety of automated sorting and scanning machinery.

Additionally, they may be asked by USPS to gather, wrap, and transport processed mail from one location to another.

To put it another way, the staff must lift and carry 70-pound mailboxes on their shoulders, arms, and shoulders.

In most cases, postal workers are not exposed to the public on a daily basis. Nevertheless, some PSE Mail Processing Clerks provide postal items and services to people via a service window.

How Much Do PSE Mail Processing Clerks Make?

PSE Mail Processing Clerks make an hourly wage of $19 on average. There is a wide variation in pay, from $14 to $26 per hour. For every additional hour a PSE works above the eight-hour daily limit, they receive overtime pay.

Do PSE Mail Processing Clerks At USPS Get Benefits?

Temporary PSE Mail Processing Clerks have a restricted benefit package, especially in their first year.
Processing clerks are solely eligible for paid time off as a perk. For every 20 paid hours worked, they get a compensated vacation hour.

The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program may provide health insurance to PSEs after one year of service. The Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program provides dental and vision coverage for federal employees.

To end things, the Federal Long-Term Care Insurance Program is available to PSEs.Temporary PSE Mail Processing Clerks have a restricted benefit package, especially in their first year. Processing clerks are solely eligible for paid time off as a perk. For every 20 paid hours worked, they get a compensated vacation hour.

The Federal Employees Health Benefits Program may provide health insurance to PSEs after one year of service. The Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program provides dental and vision coverage for federal employees.

To end things, the Federal Long-Term Care Insurance Program is available to PSEs.

What Hours Do PSE Mail Processing Clerks At USPS Work?

PSE Mail Processing Clerks’ hours and days off are very variable based on their location.
That being said, USPS plans to make this job adaptable in order to meet the ever-changing mail processing demands.

So as a result of this, PSEs may be arranged at any time of day or night, including on weekends and public holidays. Due to their need to prepare the next day’s mail for delivery, PSEs often work nights or early hours. Many PSEs also say they work up to twelve hours a day, if not more.

What Are The Requirements To Be A PSE Mail Processing Clerk At USPS?

PSE Mail Processing Clerk applicants must fulfill these qualifications:

  • Be a US citizen or a legal resident of the United States.
  • Obtain a criminal record check
  • Have a high school diploma or be at least 18 years old.
  • Possess a healthy physique (i.e., be able to lift and carry mail trays weighing up to 70lbs, be able to stand for long periods)
  • Make it through a drug test without incident
  • You must have lived in the United States for the past five years in order to apply.

Additionally, you’ll be required to pass the Postal Exam 476, an online examination. A variety of other names for this test include VEA exam (476), Virtual Entry Assessment (476), and Processing Clerk (476).

In essence, you’ll be quizzed on aspects of your personality and work history in this online exercise. Aside from that, you’ll be judged on your ability to deal with a variety of real-world job situations and your ability to spot faults in various number sets.

Additionally, the Postal Exam 476 is conducted by the candidate and takes around 45 minutes. You must, however, finish it within 72 hours after submitting your application. The exam’s total number of questions and sections are also included here.

  • Work Scenarios or Situational Judgment Test (nine questions)
  • Tell Us Your Story or Biodata Questionnaire (22 questions)
  • Describe Your Approach or Personality Test (79 questions)
  • Checks For Errors or Verifying Information Test (12 questions)

Furthermore, a score of 70 is deemed passing, but those who get a higher score have a better chance of landing a job.

What Is the Status of the USPS PSE Mail Processing Clerk?

Temporary employment as a Postal Support Employee (PSE) is available. Despite this, persons in this position are only given a maximum of 360 days to serve. After the initial period of work, a five-day gap in service allows for a future 360-day appointment to be scheduled.

Still, the USPS employs PSEs on a case-by-case basis, so a second appointment is not assured. Because of this, subsequent appointments are contingent on the volume of work and shifts in the workforce (e.g., people quitting, retiring, getting fired).

According to all of the above, a PSE job can become a long-term career opportunity. Whenever a post for an experienced PSE Mail Processing Clerk becomes available at a particular station, the senior PSE Mail Processing Clerk is given preference.

How Do I Apply To Become A PSE Mail Processing Clerk At USPS?

The 476 Postal Exam is the initial step toward a career as a PSE Mail Processing Clerk with the United States Postal Service.

You must take this virtual test within three days of submitting your application to USPS, so preparing ahead of time can help you score better and prevent unneeded anxiety. Another incentive to study ahead of time is the lengthy wait for a retake of the exam. If you fail the test, you must wait a year before attempting it again.

You must wait two years to take the exam again if you pass, but your score isn’t good enough to land a job. To learn more about the examinations and take practice tests, you can go to websites such as:

  • JobTestPrep
  • Postal Exam
  • Practice Test Geeks
  • Union Test Prep
  • Tests.com

It’s time to apply once you’ve become used to the exam format. The only way to be considered for this position is if you apply online. If you’re interested in becoming a PSE Mail Processing Clerk, follow these steps:

  • Under the Sorting & Handling tab, click on the “PSE Mail Processing Clerk” link to begin the application process.
  • Click “Apply Now.”
  • Add “PSE Mail Processing Clerk” to your search terms, and then choose your state of residence.
  • When you’ve decided on the job you want, click “Apply.”
  • Create an eCareers profile for yourself to begin the application process.
  • Within 72 hours of submitting your application, take the 476 online examination (more instructions and a link to the assessment will be emailed to you).
  • Keep an eye out for email instructions from USPS.

Is Being A PSE Mail Processing Clerk Hard?

PSE Mail Processing Clerks have described this profession as difficult for a number of reasons. The job requires a lot of physical exertion. Mail boxes weighing ten to thirty pounds must be bent, reached, and lifted when doing this task, which is not only time-consuming but also physically demanding.

In addition, personnel in this position are more likely to sustain injuries, such as cuts, bruises, and broken fingers. Because of the repetitious nature of their work, many employees complain of getting carpal tunnel or tennis elbow.

In addition, the work/life balance is difficult in this profession. PSEs report working up to 10 hours every day, with no rest during the day, and no days off in a row, among other things. PSEs are frequently called upon to work on the weekends and on public holidays, and shifts might alter at any time.

Bottom Line

It’s the PSE Clerks of the US Postal Service that are the unsung heroes. Additionally, they work under less-than-ideal conditions to expedite mail delivery by processing and sorting mail quickly.

Even if the work environment isn’t perfect, the compensation and benefits, the opportunity for growth, and the job stability all make this position appealing.

Curated posts

Someone from Jacksonville, FL just viewed Best Online Colleges for Interior Design