Education

What Is The Most Rewarding Job

By David Krug David Krug is the CEO & President of Bankovia. He's a lifelong expat who has lived in the Philippines, Mexico, Thailand, and Colombia. When he's not reading about cryptocurrencies, he's researching the latest personal finance software. 22 minute read

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the typical American worker puts in around 40 hours per week, or eight hours per workday. That’s over a third of your entire day. Considering how much time you spend working, it stands to reason that being satisfied in your employment is crucial to your well-being.

But what exactly are the qualities that make a job “good?” Careers in law, medicine, and business are often cited as examples of the best employment, but studies have shown that pay isn’t the most essential aspect.

Increasing one’s income is associated with increased happiness, but only up to a certain limit, about $75,000 per year, according to a well-known study done at Princeton University in 2010 and published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Over and above that point, more financial gain has minimal bearing on their day-to-day contentment.

Finding meaning in your work is far more important. As a matter of course, your unique character and preferences will play a role. But research suggests that there are several features shared by virtually all of the most fulfilling careers. It makes sense to zero in on occupations that satisfy these requirements if you want to discover a profession that you can be happy with.

What Makes a Career Satisfying?

More than sixty studies spanning two decades have been examined by researchers at the non-profit 80,000 Hours, who have drawn a number of conclusions about what makes people happy at work and in life. From this data, they were able to deduce the magic ingredients for a fulfilling career. The six essential components are:

  1. Fun or Satisfying Job Descriptions

Researchers polled workers across generations to determine what they valued most in an occupation for a study published in the Journal of Business Ethics (JBE) in 2017 and discussed at length in Harvard Business Review.

They discovered that “things that revolved around intrinsic drive” were the most important to people of all ages, from the traditionalists (born before 1945) to the millennials. Simply put, people sought employment that they enjoyed for its own intrinsic value.

One definition of a good work is one that keeps you interested. You can achieve what psychologists call “flow,” a state of complete absorption in what you’re doing. 80,000 Hours identifies four components that contribute to a fulfilling work experience:

  • Explicit Duties. The beginning and end times for each task are specified.
  • Autonomy. All assignments are open to individual interpretation.
  • Variety. You won’t be doing the same thing over and over again at work; instead, you’ll be doing a wide variety of assignments.
  • Feedback. The feedback you receive from your manager and peers on each assignment is very specific and helpful.

All four of these criteria were found to have significant associations with job satisfaction in a meta-analysis published in the Journal of Applied Psychology in 2007. However, a fifth element, “sense of contribution,” or the belief that one’s efforts are appreciated by others, was found to be equally significant. This fifth component may be even more important than the previous four, according to some research.

  1. Work that is Beneficial to Others

Two thousand seven hundred people were polled by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago in 2007 to gauge work satisfaction. Findings showed that caring for others, educating, and defending others were common themes among the most satisfying occupations.

In other words, persons who felt the most fulfilled by their work were those whose professions involved primarily serving the needs of others.

This conclusion is supported by more recent research. For example, in a 2017 study published in the Journal of Business and Economics, respondents of varying ages agreed that being able to help others was a key factor in giving their work purpose. Assisting others reach their goals was the most common response among traditionalists, while helping others and the community was the most common response among millennials.

Further, a study published in 2012 in the journal Personnel Psychology found that workers reported higher levels of job satisfaction the greater the extent to which they believed their work improved the lives of others.

  1. Work that you are capable of performing well

If you excel in your work, you will enjoy it more. Achieving success in your career will inspire you to keep pushing forward. In contrast, frustration and tension are more likely to result from having to work too hard at routine chores.

Those whose professions were poorly matched to their abilities were far less satisfied with their positions and more likely to be looking for new employment, according to a 2001 poll of over 2,400 people published by Oxford University Press.

Getting compliments on your work is one of the four pillars of a satisfying employment. It also helps you bargain for additional workplace perks that matter to you. You may want to negotiate for better working conditions, such as more income or a more manageable schedule. Your supervisor is more likely to grant your demands if you’re a hard worker who contributes significantly to the firm.

Last but not least, your chances of being promoted and given more possibilities at work increase as your performance there improves. Though a promotion to a higher-paying or more prestigious post might not instantly boost your mood, knowing that you’re making headway in your career almost certainly would.

  1. Coworker Relationships that are Positive

If you despise your boss and your coworkers, it won’t matter how interesting or important your work is; you won’t look forward to going to work. For this reason, one of the most important factors in enjoying one’s work is getting along well with others in the office.

Of course, the types of people with whom you seem to click will vary depending on who you ask. People have a natural tendency to form bonds with those who are similar to themselves in terms of personality traits, worldview, and other dimensions. It’s a good sign if you find that several of your employees share your interests and/or background.

Having a positive working relationship with your coworkers does not necessitate loving or being friends with everyone you work with. What’s more important is that you have access to assistance and encouragement from them in the workplace when you need it.

This form of “social support,” according to a meta-analysis published in the Journal of Applied Psychology in 2007, is a major factor in determining whether or not an employee will be happy in their current position.

  1. A Healthy Work-Life Balance

Even if you want to enjoy your work, you don’t want it to be your primary or even your only source of happiness. Family, friends, interests, and volunteer work are all great ways to fill your life with happiness.

A fulfilling career is one that allows you to spend time on both professional and personal pursuits. According to a 2017 survey published in the Journal of Business and Economics, employees of Generation X value work-life balance more than any other generation.

There is no universally accepted definition of equilibrium. There are many who thrive on working 40, 50, or even 60 hours each week, and there are those who would rather put in only 30, 25, or even 20.

The majority of individuals prefer working full-time but not longer than full-time, according to a 2012 article by the New Economics Foundation that summarized 20 years of studies in happiness economics. Employees are less committed to their jobs when they have to put in long hours.

The location and specific time of these hours are also important considerations. For some, having a job with regular business hours (say, Monday through Friday, 9 to 5) is sufficient assurance that the job won’t intrude on their personal lives outside of those hours. Many, however, state that they would rather have a more adaptable work schedule so that they may better balance their professional and personal lives. Others would rather have the flexibility to work anywhere they like.

Many jobs in the present day fall short in this regard. A 2018 research by Werk found that 96% of workers wanted more freedom to choose their own hours and location, but just 47% stated they actually had this option. Work that allowed for this kind of adaptability was usually in great demand.

  1. There are no significant drawbacks.

Even if a job seems ideal on the surface—interesting and rewarding, you get along well with your coworkers, you have some leeway in how and when you get things done—it could still be terrible. Long hours aren’t the only thing that can damage a job.

  • Long travel times. According to the science of happiness economics, a lengthy commute is a significant contributor to stress and depression. According to a research published in Science in 2004 on how people spend their time, driving to and from work was rated as the least enjoyable of 16 common daily activities, ranking below even doing actual work at the office. People who had to travel a long distance each day to and from work reported lower levels of life satisfaction, according to a study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Economics in 2008.
  • Anxiety over one’s future in one’s current position. It’s tough to take pleasure in your work when you have no idea how long you’ll be able to keep it. Those who are worried about their employment prospects are less likely to feel fulfilled by their work and have lower levels of stress. The Journal of Occupational Health Psychology published a meta-analysis in 2002 that indicated employees with lower job security were less satisfied with their occupations, had poorer health, and occasionally performed less competently than their counterparts with higher job security.
  • Environment of Work. If your job is dangerous or unpleasant, it won’t matter if it’s secure or not; it will still be a source of stress. Research conducted in 2013 on a Croatian shipbuilding firm indicated that factory workers, who faced more perilous and demanding conditions on the job than their office counterparts, reported lower levels of job satisfaction.
  • The Pay is Unfair. As was previously mentioned, money isn’t the most important aspect of a profession. However, if your salary is noticeably lower than that of your coworkers, you may get dissatisfied with your job. Lower income workers report lower levels of job satisfaction, as confirmed by a 1996 Journal of Public Economics study, and lower levels of life satisfaction, as confirmed by a 2005 study published in The Quarterly Journal of Economics.
  • Degree of Stress. Research by 80,000 Hours suggests that there are positive aspects to experiencing stress on the job. According to a meta-analysis of several large-scale research, doing work that never presents any kind of challenge is likely to become monotonous and disappointing. The perfect job would be tough, but not impossible to complete. Your limitations should be tested sometimes without being constantly exceeded.

The Most Satisfying Jobs

Career satisfaction based on the aforementioned factors will differ from person to person. However, we can obtain an idea of which occupations people, on average, find the most rewarding.

MyPlan, a popular career resource, polled its more than 13,000 registered users to determine which occupations are the most and least fulfilling. Similarly, Payscale polled over 2 million employees. They were polled on how they felt about their work overall and how they felt about their jobs’ significance in making the world a better place. We compared the 2007 NORC survey findings with each of these lists to determine which occupations are most likely to provide their workers with a sense of purpose and fulfillment.

Next, we used wage information to narrow the field. We selected the list to include only positions that provide a livable wage because, although income isn’t a key indicator of job happiness, it is still crucial to have enough to live on.

We utilized the Economic Policy Institute’s Family Budget Calculator to arrive at that number (EPI). It provides ballpark figures on what it would take to provide “a modest yet decent standard of living” for a family of three in various US regions. We utilized the calculator’s calculations for Hawaii, which a 2019 CNBC investigation determined to be the most costly state to live in, to ensure that the occupations on our list would all provide enough income to cover basic expenses across the United States.

The EPI calculator estimates that a single person in Hawaii County, Hawaii would require a yearly income of $42,785 to get by. Using data from Payscale and the BLS’s Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), we were able to eliminate any potential careers that did not offer at least this much money. Keep in mind that this is just one person’s minimum salary. The EPI calculator estimates that a family of four (two adults and two children) living in the same area would require a substantially higher income, amounting to at least $93,441.

We ranked the careers based on their expected rate of expansion. After all, there’s no use dreaming about a dream career if there’s little chance you’ll ever get it. Based on OOH data, we reduced the list down to occupations predicted to create at least 5,000 jobs over the next decade, indicating a faster-than-average rate of growth.

With these factors in mind, these are the top occupations to consider.

  1. Clergy

Priests, ministers, pastors, deacons, imams, and rabbis are only some examples of clergy who fall under the umbrella term “religious leaders.” Those in the clergy are responsible for leading religious services and advising parishioners on ethical and spiritual matters.

They are responsible for planning and leading religious education programs as well as leading religious services, including praying, reading from sacred scriptures, and preaching. 

Different faiths have different educational and experience requirements for their clergy, but most ministers have at least a bachelor’s degree.

Both the Payscale survey and the 2007 NORC study rank this occupation as the most satisfying in terms of working conditions. Ninety percent of clergy members in Payscale’s survey said they felt their work was significant, and an even higher percentage said it was rewarding.

There is no other occupation on Payscale’s list where workers report a higher level of significance and happiness in their work (90%+). However, only 19th in a smaller survey done by MyPlan were ministers found to be satisfied with their jobs.

People don’t get into this field because of the pay, so it’s a good thing the work itself is rewarding. The median salary reported by clergy members questioned by Payscale was $46,600, which just squeaked under our $30,000 threshold for poverty. The median income is the salary at which half the workers in a field make more than while the other half earn less.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics puts the median annual salary for clergy members at $50,400; yet, this is still not enough to provide for a family in many areas of the country.

As a profession, it is not extensively covered by the OOH. However, the BLS projects a more typical rate of growth for this sector, somewhere around 4% over the next decade. There were around 243,900 clergy members in the United States as of 2019. The BLS projects a growth of 9,700 clergy positions by 2029.

  1. Firefighters

When there is a fire, the first individuals on the scene are firefighters, who are responsible for extinguishing the fire, rescuing anyone trapped inside, and assisting with any medical needs that may arise as a result of the incident.

They’re also helpful in instances like automobile accidents and bomb scares. Nearly two out of every three calls to firefighters are for medical emergencies, says the National Fire Protection Association. It is common for firefighters to work 24-hour shifts, during which they eat and sleep in the fire station.

A high school certificate and certification as an EMT are typically required for entry-level positions as firefighters. On-the-job training is available in municipal or state fire academies. It’s not enough to just know how to put out fires; you have to prove it by passing a rigorous physical and mental test before you can even get on the fire truck.

A firefighter’s job is challenging and dangerous, but also very rewarding because they save lives every day. Over 87% of respondents to the NORC study found this work to be “extremely gratifying,” placing it in the top three of the list of most satisfying employment. 

Ninety percent of workers in this field say they enjoy their careers, making it the second-most-satisfying profession on MyPlan. Payscale’s poll ranks it lower, but it still receives good marks (83% satisfaction and 88% meaning).

Equally precarious is a firefighter’s ability to make a decent living income. The average income for a fireman is only $43,100 per year, according to Payscale. The OOH, on the other hand, calculates it to be $51,850.

The good news is that job growth in this sector is fairly robust, clocking in at roughly 6% over the next decade. By 2029, the OOH projects that there will be 375,800 firefighters in the United States, up from 335,500 in 2019.

  1. Teachers

Job description is a little vague. Educators come in numerous forms, from those who work with children as young as kindergarteners to university professors teaching in a wide range of fields. Although sources disagree on which specific sorts of educators enjoy the highest work satisfaction, teaching appears on virtually every top-ten list, showing that many find the profession rewarding as a whole.

Teaching is a broad field with a vast range of specializations, each with its own unique set of demands on teachers and methods of preparation. Teachers in elementary and primary schools, for instance, are expected to have a bachelor’s degree and a state teaching certificate before they can begin their work in the classroom. Professors in universities, on the other hand, are expected to hold a doctoral degree and spend their time teaching, evaluating student work, providing academic guidance, and conducting independent research.

Our sources show that several methods of education are widely regarded as effective. With high grades from almost 69% of respondents, the NORC survey ranks “teacher” as the sixth most gratifying employment in the U.S. with no additional descriptor.

Professors at all levels of education (high school, middle school, and university) who teach vocational or elective courses consistently receive MyPlan satisfaction scores of 70% or above. Payscale awards professors in some colleges (but, oddly, not in the same disciplines as MyPlan) and teachers in high schools and middle schools with overall scores of 70% or above.

Teachers’ salaries and career opportunities are conditional on the subject matter they teach. Higher education institutions tend to pay their teachers more.

  1. Pediatricians

To put it simply, pediatricians are medical professionals who focus on caring for young patients. Most of their time is devoted to treating children for things like cuts and fevers. 

They also make sure that children are up-to-date on their vaccines. Some pediatricians focus solely on pediatric surgery or on managing complex diseases like autoimmunity.

Pediatricians, like all other types of doctors, must complete extensive education. They need a four-year college degree, then another four years of medical school, an internship, and a residency program to become a doctor. An additional four or five years are required for dual residencies in pediatrics and another medical specialty, as stated by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Doctors of all specialties report high levels of happiness on the job, but pediatricians top the list. Payscale reports that pediatricians have a high level of job satisfaction (89%), and a high level of job meaning (88%). Compared to other types of doctors like surgeons, psychologists, and anesthesiologists, that’s not a particularly high score for job meaning, but it’s a far higher rating for job satisfaction. MyPlan ranks pediatricians as the fourth best profession overall, with 80% of pediatricians reporting job satisfaction.

As a profession, pediatrics provides its practitioners with both personal satisfaction and financial security. The BLS reports that in 2019, pediatricians earned a median annual pay of $175,310. While the BLS does not provide a forecast for this specific industry, it does predict overall employment for doctors and surgeons will grow by 4 percent in the next decade. With an estimated 29,740 pediatricians in the United States, the pace of growth would result in 1,190 additional pediatrician positions by the year 2029.

  1. Physical Therapists

Those in need of physical therapy services can expect assistance in overcoming pain and regaining mobility after suffering an injury or sickness. They assist people in reducing their discomfort and increasing their range of motion through the use of methods such as stretches, other exercises, and body manipulation.

A doctor of physical therapy (DPT) degree is required for entry into the field, and these programs can be finished in as little as three years following graduation from an accredited undergraduate institution. It is possible to complete a combined bachelor’s/DPT program in six or seven years.

According to the NORC study, physiotherapists report higher levels of job satisfaction than any other profession except for clergy. However, the reviews of this profession in other places are more contradictory. Payscale reports that while 90% of PTs find significance in their work, just 72% find it gratifying. According to data compiled by MyPlan, just 66% of workers in this field report being happy in their careers, placing them at #37 out of a list of 300 occupations.

Nevertheless, physical therapists have a bright future in terms of both salary and employment opportunities. According to Payscale, the median income for those working in this industry is $73,400, while the OOH places it even higher at $89,440. According to the OOH, there will be 47,000 new employment created in this sector over the next decade.  That’s an increase of 18 percent.

  1. Chief Executives

Any corporation, nonprofit, university, or government entity will have someone in charge known as the chief executive or chief executive officer (CEO). When other executives at a company are busy with specific tasks like marketing or product development, the CEO is responsible for keeping an eye on the big picture.

The chief executive officer (CEO) of a firm is responsible for establishing the company’s strategic direction and implementing the company’s policies. The ramifications of this on a daily basis will differ based on the scope of the business. When leading a Fortune 500 firm, the CEO is responsible for collaborating with the board of directors to establish corporate strategy and coordinating the efforts of a large number of other executives and managers. In contrast, the CEO of a small firm, like a neighborhood coffee shop, may have to do everything from hiring and training new employees to managing the books and even serving customers.

One can reach the position of CEO through a number of routes. Getting to the top of the corporate food chain usually requires years of hard effort and climbing the corporate ladder. A bachelor’s degree in business or a closely related subject is preferred. However, some people get to the position of chief executive by launching and growing their own firms.

The NORC survey does not include C-suite executives. On the other hand, MyPlan ranks them fifteenth from the top in terms of employee happiness, with an average score of about 72 percent. According to CEOs polled by Payscale, 88% find their work extremely satisfying, and 74% find it extremely meaningful.

Executives earn a median salary of $184,460 per year, per the BLS. Revenues, however, can range substantially from one company to the next. Ten percent of workers in this industry make less than $62,290 per year. In contrast to the OOH’s projection of 115,000 new positions for “top executives,” the BLS does not project job growth particularly for CEOs over the next decade.

  1. Psychologists

Scientists who specialize in the study of human behavior and mental processes. Some psychologists work as mental health professionals, conducting evaluations and prescribing therapies including therapy, medication, and/or counseling to help patients improve their mental health.

On the other hand, there are scientists who use controlled experiments to learn more about the human mind.

The vast majority of practicing psychologists hold either a doctor of psychology (Psy.D.) or a doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in the field of psychology. The primary focus of a Psy.D. degree is on clinical training, while a Ph.D. program is on research. Clinical psychologists are required to undergo an internship of at least one year as part of their doctoral training.

According to the NORC research, 67% of psychologists report being “extremely satisfied” with their job satisfaction. According to Payscale, 78 percent of psychologists feel highly satisfied in their careers, and 88 percent feel like their work has a significant impact on the world. However, psychologists have substantially lower job satisfaction scores than the average professional (62.5%).

According to Payscale’s compensation data, a clinical, counseling, or school psychologist can expect to make a median annual salary of $60,800. According to the OOH, however, the median wage of psychologists is far higher, at $80,370 per year. Moreover, it forecasts a 3% increase in employment opportunities in this sector by the year 2029, totaling 5,700 positions.

  1. Criminal Investigators and Detectives

In the world of policing, you can find two distinct varieties. Detectives and criminologists in law enforcement agencies look into criminal cases. In order to identify the perpetrators and bring them to justice, investigators conduct interviews with witnesses, review relevant documents, keep tabs on potential offenders, and collect other forms of evidence. The majority of police detectives have a particular focus, such as homicide or fraud.

Private investigators (PIs) or private detectives (PDs) may look into criminal cases on behalf of their clients, although the vast majority of the time they are hired to look into matters of law, finance, or the individual client’s own life. This could be done for a variety of reasons, such as investigating workplace theft, finding a missing person, checking someone’s background, or catching a cheating spouse during a divorce proceeding. It’s not uncommon for private investigators to work for corporations, helping them uncover issues like insurance fraud.

Police agencies have different entry standards for detective positions. In most cases, the minimum educational requirement for entry into the force is a high school diploma, and applicants must also complete any further training that is stipulated by their department. The majority of detectives begin their careers as patrol policemen. FBI agents and other federal investigators are expected to have at least some college education.

Although a bachelor’s degree is not typically required for entry-level positions, private investigators may need a two- or four-year college degree for some positions in fields like criminal justice. They also put in a minimum of a year of on-the-job training. Experience in law enforcement, federal intelligence, or the armed forces is often required for PI positions.

The NORC study found that detectives were not among the top 12 most satisfied workers, but that “police and detectives” had a higher-than-average job satisfaction rating, with 59.3% reporting high levels of satisfaction. Seventy-seven percent of PIs and investigators in general express happiness with their careers on MyPlan. Overall, employees at Payscale give the position a 78% meaning rating and a 74% satisfaction rating.

Detection and investigation specialists earn a median salary of $67,300 annually, as reported by Payscale. Although the OOH does not specifically name police detectives as a profession, it does state that police and detectives as a whole have a median salary of $65,170 per year, while private investigators have a median salary of $50,510 per year.

Over the next decade, the police sector as a whole is projected to grow by 5%, creating 40,600 new employment, the vast majority of which will not be detective positions. But because private investigation is a rather niche industry to begin with, its projected 8% growth will result in only 3,000 net new jobs.

  1. Physician Assistants

In the world of policing, you can find two distinct varieties. Detectives and criminologists in law enforcement agencies look into criminal cases. In order to identify the perpetrators and bring them to justice, investigators conduct interviews with witnesses, review relevant documents, keep tabs on potential offenders, and collect other forms of evidence. The majority of police detectives have a particular focus, such as homicide or fraud.

Private investigators (PIs) or private detectives (PDs) may look into criminal cases on behalf of their clients, although the vast majority of the time they are hired to look into matters of law, finance, or the individual client’s own life. This could be done for a variety of reasons, such as investigating workplace theft, finding a missing person, checking someone’s background, or catching a cheating spouse during a divorce proceeding. It’s not uncommon for private investigators to work for corporations, helping them uncover issues like insurance fraud.

Police agencies have different entry standards for detective positions. In most cases, the minimum educational requirement for entry into the force is a high school diploma, and applicants must also complete any further training that is stipulated by their department. The majority of detectives begin their careers as patrol policemen. FBI agents and other federal investigators are expected to have at least some college education.

Although a bachelor’s degree is not typically required for entry-level positions, private investigators may need a two- or four-year college degree for some positions in fields like criminal justice. They also put in a minimum of a year of on-the-job training. Experience in law enforcement, federal intelligence, or the armed forces is often required for PI positions.

The NORC study found that detectives were not among the top 12 most satisfied workers, but that “police and detectives” had a higher-than-average job satisfaction rating, with 59.3% reporting high levels of satisfaction. Seventy-seven percent of PIs and investigators in general express happiness with their careers on MyPlan. Overall, employees at Payscale give the position a 78% meaning rating and a 74% satisfaction rating.

Detection and investigation specialists earn a median salary of $67,300 annually, as reported by Payscale. Although the OOH does not specifically name police detectives as a profession, it does state that police and detectives as a whole have a median salary of $65,170 per year, while private investigators have a median salary of $50,510 per year.

Over the next decade, the police sector as a whole is projected to grow by 5%, creating 40,600 new employment, the vast majority of which will not be detective positions. But because private investigation is a rather niche industry to begin with, its projected 8% growth will result in only 3,000 net new jobs.

  1. School and Career Counselors

Counselors in educational and occupational settings guide students toward successful completion of their academic and professional goals. Both tasks are similar enough that one individual can sometimes handle both of them. Job counselors help students select a career route or an educational program that will lead to a career, while school counselors help students enhance their academic and social abilities.

Career counselors are classified as “educational, vocational, and career counselors” on both Payscale and MyPlan. Customers are satisfied with MyPlan on average to the tune of 80%. With a 72% satisfaction rating and an 80% meaning rating on Payscale, it’s a job well done.

However, financial prospects aren’t as bright in this industry. The median yearly salary for a counselor is about $40,800, according to Payscale, which is significantly lower than the minimum wage in most countries.

The OOH, however, estimates substantially higher median wages of $57,040 per year for those in this profession. Employment in this sector is expected to rise rapidly over the next decade, with an additional 26,800 positions expected to be produced over the course of the next decade.

Bottom Line

You’ll find that there’s a lot of variation on this list. It doesn’t specialize in any one field or group of abilities. Jobs ranging from those requiring a doctorate to those requiring only a high school education are included. Some careers require you to collaborate with large teams, while others focus more on one-on-one communication.

All of this is encouraging because it suggests that people from all walks of life can find fulfilling careers. It also means that there is a decent chance of finding a career that may make you happy and pay the bills even if none of the jobs on this list look like they would be a good fit for you.

Think about what you’re good at and what you’re interested in doing, then search for employment that fit the bill; finally, research the jobs on sites like Payscale to get a sense of how satisfied other people seem in those roles. If the vast majority of people who have taken a certain career path are happy they did, there’s a decent chance it will be successful for you as well.

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