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Education

How Long Does It Take To Get A Masters In Nursing

By David Krug 7 minute read

Advanced practice nurses (APNs) are registered nurses who wish to advance their nursing careers (APRN). Graduate or terminal degrees in nursing are required for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs). Nurse practitioners, forensic nurses, administrators, informaticians, and public health practitioners are just a few of the advanced practice degrees available. It is possible to become a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) or a doctor of nurse anesthesia practice (DNAP). The demand for advanced practice nurses is expected to rise by 26 percent over the next decade, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The projected growth rate for all occupations is significantly higher than this.

MSN degrees can have a significant impact on your salary. Nurses in advanced practice earn an average salary of $113,930, compared to the $71,730 average salary for nurses in regular practice.

Graduate-level nursing education is required for most Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degrees, according to US News & World Report (USNWR). In most cases, a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree requires 36 credit hours. Nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and clinical nurse specialists all require more credit hours than other MSN concentrations because of the additional clinical hours required to qualify for licensure. With a bachelor’s degree in nursing and full-time study, you can earn your Master of Science in Nursing degree in as little as 18 to 24 months. An MSN degree from an RN to MSN degree can take up to 36 months, depending on the courses required. They are called “bridge programs” because they combine the RN and MSN degrees into a single program. These programs must include BSN courses that are relevant to the core curriculum of the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). One or two additional years on top of the standard MSN track may be required for this additional training.

Core Courses for Graduate Nursing Education

The majority of nurses begin the MSN program with a bachelor’s degree in nursing. A BSN is becoming increasingly necessary for entry-level nurses to work in hospitals, so there is a lot of pressure on them to get one. The following examples are based on BSN to MSN degree programs because most nurses complete a BSN before applying for an MSN degree. After completing the MSN core curriculum, nurses have the option of pursuing a graduate-level specialty in their field of practice. Graduate nursing programs’ core curriculum courses include:

  • Systems of healthcare
  • Research and theory
  • Health care for a diverse population
  • Health-care legal and ethical dilemmas

Students at different universities may have slightly different course offerings, but they are all required to study a similar set of topics. After completing the core curriculum classes for graduate school, students can begin taking courses that are specific to their degree plan. This is the case, for example, when students are pursuing an MSN in nursing education, which is a specialization in the field. The typical MSN degree requires a total of 12 classes to complete, which equates to 36 credit hours. Core classes are included in this. The “elective courses” offered by some colleges can add anywhere from 3 to 9 additional credit hours. This could add a semester or two to your education.

Taking two classes per semester (Fall, Spring, Summer) will allow you to graduate in 24 months. For the fall and spring semesters, 16-week courses are offered and for the summer semesters, 8-week courses are offered. Non-traditional semesters, such as those offered online that are six, eight, or ten weeks long, may shorten the time it takes to earn an MSN degree by a significant margin. The degree will be completed much more quickly if you attend an online college that offers 8-week courses and take full time (2 classes) each session. If the college allows for rolling start dates or gives students a few weeks off between courses, this may also be a factor. Your MSN degree completion time depends on whether or not you are willing to work while attending classes and whether or not you are able to handle the stress of working and attending school at the same time.. Many students complete the MSN degree in three to four years by taking one class at a time.

The focus of the nursing education program

Nurse educators can expect to spend 18-24 months completing their MSN, which typically entails 35-39 credit hours of coursework. Taking two or three classes in a traditional semester is considered full-time in graduate school. Both clinical and academic settings can be utilized by nurse educators, allowing them to teach the next generation of nurses effectively. In light of the growing popularity of online education, some schools may be able to offer students more flexibility in terms of starting dates or even rolling admission dates, allowing them to complete their degrees at a rate that suits them. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Pathophysiology in depth
  • Pharmacology in its most advanced form
  • A more in-depth examination of the body
  • Issues in the education of nurses
  • Methods of teaching in the field of nursing
  • The process of creating, implementing, and evaluating a curriculum
  • The final proctored exam, the capstone project, and the nursing practicum

An emphasis on Forensic Nursing

About 18-24 months is required to complete a Master of Science in Forensic Nursing. forensic nursing is a relatively new nursing specialty that offers advanced degrees. There are numerous opportunities for forensic nurses to work with law enforcement for the benefit of the neighborhood. Legal testimony, corrections, and sexual crimes can all be learned about in court hearings. They’re also taught about how to deter violence. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Pathophysiology in depth
  • Pharmacology in its most advanced form
  • Medical forensics
  • Corrections that are more advanced.
  • Specialized forensic nursing care
  • The final proctored exam, the capstone project, and the nursing practicum

Concentration in Nursing Management and Administration

Another popular advanced degree is the Master of Science in Nursing with a concentration in Nursing Administration and Management, which takes 18-24 months to complete on average. Candidates seeking to advance into management positions in the nursing profession should consider pursuing an MSN in nursing administration and management as a degree option. Nurse managers have a unique set of skills that sets them apart from other professionals in the healthcare field. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Today’s businesses and health care systems are influenced by modern technology.
  • Informatics in healthcare
  • Healthcare informatics that are at the cutting edge
  • Finance and economics of health care
  • Strategic planning and management in health care
  • I and II of the practicum in nursing administration
  • The final proctored nursing exam and capstone project.

The practicum component of most administration degree programs is heavily weighted toward positions of leadership. Since leadership can only be learned by doing, this is a more hands-on learning method.

Concentration in Computer Science and Information Technology

To earn a Master of Science in Nursing with an Informatics concentration, students must complete a total of 36 credit hours, or roughly 12 courses. When working full-time, it will take between 18 months and 24 months to complete this. Informatics-trained nurses can use computers to solve nursing problems. Nursing informatics and computer science are woven together in this degree program The title of “nurse informaticist” is the result. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Informatics in healthcare
  • Finance and economics of health care
  • The control of computer networks
  • Strategic planning for information systems
  • Markets, customers, and technology
  • Health care informatics at its pinnacle.
  • Proctored exams for the practicum, capstone project, and diploma.

Concentration in the field of public health

You can earn your Master of Science in Nursing degree with a concentration in Public Health in just 18-24 months. When it comes to caring for patients in the community, public health nurses keep up with the times. In the MSN program in public health, students learn about epidemiology and the role that public health plays at all levels, including local, state, national, and international levels. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Pathophysiology in depth
  • Pharmacology in its most advanced form
  • A more in-depth examination of the body
  • Nursing care for people with disabilities in the community
  • The nursing program in college
  • Home health care and case management
  • The final proctored exam, the capstone project, and the nursing practicum

Concentration in Family Nursing

It takes longer to complete the Master of Science in Nursing with a Family Nurse Practitioner concentration because of the clinical hours. In order to earn a Master of Science in Nursing (FNP) degree, students must complete a minimum of 46 credit hours. An MSN-FNP is a licensed and independent practitioner who can assess, diagnose, treat and manage acute and chronic illnesses in a variety of settings. Working full-time as a registered nurse makes going to school full-time difficult, but many do it anyway. Those students who have completed the core curriculum will be able to choose from the following classes:

  • Pathophysiology in depth
  • Pharmacology in its most advanced form
  • A comprehensive evaluation of one’s health and a determination of a diagnosis
  • Adult geriatrics evaluation laboratory
  • Children’s evaluation laboratory
  • Advanced practice nurses’ guide to clinical procedures and protocols
  • In advanced practice, the nurse’s role is critical.
  • It’s a three-generational family.
  • Preparing to practice clinical medicine
  • Proctored final exam and practicum for Family NPs.

Nurse practitioner degrees can take three to four years to complete because of the additional coursework and clinical requirements. On average, it takes 24 months to earn a Master of Science in Nursing degree. Taking one class at a time is still an option, but it may take twice as long, depending on your degree path. Becomeing an advanced practice nurse (APN) may be the best route for you to take if you want to progress in your nursing career.

Chatham’s Tessa

Nursing Education Master’s Degree | Aspen University

TCU Nursing Bachelor of Science in Science (B.S.)

Psychological and English studies at the University of Texas at Arlington

The month of November of the following year (2019)

David Krug

Author